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Posts tagged lgbtq

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Rhode Island Becomes 10th State With Gay Marriage - ABC News

Rhode Island on Thursday became the nation’s 10th state to allow gay and lesbian couples to wed, as a 16-year effort to extend marriage rights in this heavily Roman Catholic state ended with the triumphant cheers of hundreds of gays, lesbians, their families and friends.

Gov. Lincoln Chafee signed the bill into law on the Statehouse steps Thursday evening following a final 56-15 vote in the House. The first weddings will take place Aug. 1, when the law takes effect.

Filed under news politics gay marriage lgbtq rhode island marriage equality

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 Why the Gay-Marriage Fight Is Over : The New Yorker
"Everyone knows that same-sex marriage is here to stay; indeed, it’s expanding throughout the country at a pace that few could have imagined just a few years ago. The Justices were not irrelevant to the process, but they weren’t central either. They knew that—and so did everyone else. … [Justice Elena Kagan] had the temerity to tell what everyone knew to be the truth—that DOMA was a bigoted law designed to humiliate and oppress gay people.”
 You’d be under a rock not to know what’s going on concerning same sex marriage. However, I wouldn’t jump for joy just yet. DOMA, it looks like, is definitely going into a shredder. However, Prop 8 doesn’t seem to be the place to observe a “gay marriage victory”. The Supreme Court can decide the case doesn’t have standing, or they can decide to strike down the law FOR ONLY CALIFORNIA. However, it ultimately looks like a good two days for civil rights.

Why the Gay-Marriage Fight Is Over : The New Yorker

"Everyone knows that same-sex marriage is here to stay; indeed, it’s expanding throughout the country at a pace that few could have imagined just a few years ago. The Justices were not irrelevant to the process, but they weren’t central either. They knew that—and so did everyone else. … [Justice Elena Kagan] had the temerity to tell what everyone knew to be the truth—that DOMA was a bigoted law designed to humiliate and oppress gay people.”

You’d be under a rock not to know what’s going on concerning same sex marriage. However, I wouldn’t jump for joy just yet. DOMA, it looks like, is definitely going into a shredder. However, Prop 8 doesn’t seem to be the place to observe a “gay marriage victory”. The Supreme Court can decide the case doesn’t have standing, or they can decide to strike down the law FOR ONLY CALIFORNIA. However, it ultimately looks like a good two days for civil rights.

Filed under same sex marriage gay rights gay marriage lgbtq supreme court prop 8 proposition 8 doma justice news politics opinion elena kagan kagan new yorker

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 Courting Cowardice on Same-Sex Marriage - NYTimes.com
"How could the nine, cloistered behind velvety rose curtains, marble pillars and archaic customs, possibly assess the potential effects of gay marriage? … This court is plenty bold imposing bad decisions on the country, like anointing W. president or allowing unlimited money to flow covertly into campaigns. But given a chance to make a bold decision putting them on the right, and popular, side of history, they squirm.”
 It’s ridiculous that we are all looking at this court to enact one of the most important social changes to come to this country, yet they’re all afraid of “moving too fast”. This isn’t a high school date, Justices.

Courting Cowardice on Same-Sex Marriage - NYTimes.com

"How could the nine, cloistered behind velvety rose curtains, marble pillars and archaic customs, possibly assess the potential effects of gay marriage? … This court is plenty bold imposing bad decisions on the country, like anointing W. president or allowing unlimited money to flow covertly into campaigns. But given a chance to make a bold decision putting them on the right, and popular, side of history, they squirm.”

It’s ridiculous that we are all looking at this court to enact one of the most important social changes to come to this country, yet they’re all afraid of “moving too fast”. This isn’t a high school date, Justices.

Filed under nytimes news opinion politics lgbtq gay rights civil rights gay marriage prop 8 doma supreme court

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 PORTMAN: Coming out | Yale Daily News
"I came to Yale as a freshman in the fall of 2010 with two big uncertainties hanging over my head: whether my dad would get elected to the Senate in November, and whether I’d ever work up the courage to come out of the closet, … I could certainly do without … commentators weighing in to tell me things like living my life honestly and fully is ‘harmful to [me] and society as a whole.’ But in many ways it’s been a privilege to come out so publicly, … I hope that my dad’s announcement and our family’s story will have a positive impact on anyone who is closeted and afraid.”
 Interesting piece by Rob Portman’s son on how he ended up coming out to his conservative Republican father, Rob Portman. Prop 8 and DOMA are to come up in front of the Supreme Court soon, so this is important in context. Still don’t know why it took Portman so long to come out in support, even if it was a political sacrifice.

PORTMAN: Coming out | Yale Daily News

"I came to Yale as a freshman in the fall of 2010 with two big uncertainties hanging over my head: whether my dad would get elected to the Senate in November, and whether I’d ever work up the courage to come out of the closet, … I could certainly do without … commentators weighing in to tell me things like living my life honestly and fully is ‘harmful to [me] and society as a whole.’ But in many ways it’s been a privilege to come out so publicly, … I hope that my dad’s announcement and our family’s story will have a positive impact on anyone who is closeted and afraid.”

Interesting piece by Rob Portman’s son on how he ended up coming out to his conservative Republican father, Rob Portman. Prop 8 and DOMA are to come up in front of the Supreme Court soon, so this is important in context. Still don’t know why it took Portman so long to come out in support, even if it was a political sacrifice.

Filed under portman gay lgbtq gay rights gay marriage rob portman news politics opinion

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 Antonin Scalia Lectures a Princeton Student on Gay Rights and the Court : The New Yorker
Amy Davidson on Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.
““If we cannot have moral feelings against homosexuality, can we have it against murder? Can we have it against these other things?” he said to Hosie. “Of course we can. I don’t apologize for the things I raised. I’m not comparing homosexuality to murder. I’m comparing the principle that a society may not adopt moral sanctions, moral views, against certain conduct. I’m comparing that with respect to murder and that with respect to homosexuality.” He said that it was an argument by way of reduction to the absurd—and, since this is Scalia, he did so with a note of something between sarcasm, condescension, and stubbornness: “It’s a type of argument that I thought you would have known…. I’m surprised you aren’t persuaded.””
A freshman from Princeton, Duncan Hosie, called Justice Scalia’s comments about gay marriage equating to murder when considering morality offensive, and wanted to know if his tone has changed since two former decisions on gay rights cases (Romer v. Evans, and Lawrence v. Texas). “Do you have any… shame for drawing these comparisons…?” Scalia said what the quote states above, that he wasn’t comparing homosexuality to murder, just the moral stance of it. People will be listening intently to what Scalia says when the Court reviews Prop 8 and DOMA, since he hasn’t budged on his views.
The best shot for someone to overturn the Defense Against Marriage Act is Edith Windsor. She was stuck with $600,000 in taxes after her wife, Thea Spyer, died from multiple sclerosis. If Edith was recognized as the legitimate widow, she would be spared these expenses. Gay marriage advocates are hoping that Edith’s story would change Scalia’s heart and mind. Scalia believes that he is justified, however, because is precedent in cases that went against homosexual litigation. But where a judge sees precedent in cases, the people see love and caring for their neighbor, which is why they don’t give jack shit that a bunch a papers prove how discriminatory people can be.
Scalia points out, also, that the speed in which gay marriage has come before the court is too quick. After all, the anti-sodomy ruling of Bowers v. Harding was only 17 years ago. My message here for Scalia is this: are you surprised that time doesn’t stand still? As people have learned during the AIDS crisis, it is important to be able to be recognized as next to kin when your spouse is in danger of leaving this world. The benefits of marriage have protected and supported those who have just a loved one and are stuck in a position where they wouldn’t be able to solve a fiscal dilemma. Davidson thinks the country is ready to answer the gay marriage question, and so do I. It’s time to stop thinking the world moves slower than it really does, just so like how so many others stopped believing the world was fucking flat.

 Antonin Scalia Lectures a Princeton Student on Gay Rights and the Court : The New Yorker

Amy Davidson on Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

““If we cannot have moral feelings against homosexuality, can we have it against murder? Can we have it against these other things?” he said to Hosie. “Of course we can. I don’t apologize for the things I raised. I’m not comparing homosexuality to murder. I’m comparing the principle that a society may not adopt moral sanctions, moral views, against certain conduct. I’m comparing that with respect to murder and that with respect to homosexuality.” He said that it was an argument by way of reduction to the absurd—and, since this is Scalia, he did so with a note of something between sarcasm, condescension, and stubbornness: “It’s a type of argument that I thought you would have known…. I’m surprised you aren’t persuaded.””

A freshman from Princeton, Duncan Hosie, called Justice Scalia’s comments about gay marriage equating to murder when considering morality offensive, and wanted to know if his tone has changed since two former decisions on gay rights cases (Romer v. Evans, and Lawrence v. Texas). “Do you have any… shame for drawing these comparisons…?” Scalia said what the quote states above, that he wasn’t comparing homosexuality to murder, just the moral stance of it. People will be listening intently to what Scalia says when the Court reviews Prop 8 and DOMA, since he hasn’t budged on his views.

The best shot for someone to overturn the Defense Against Marriage Act is Edith Windsor. She was stuck with $600,000 in taxes after her wife, Thea Spyer, died from multiple sclerosis. If Edith was recognized as the legitimate widow, she would be spared these expenses. Gay marriage advocates are hoping that Edith’s story would change Scalia’s heart and mind. Scalia believes that he is justified, however, because is precedent in cases that went against homosexual litigation. But where a judge sees precedent in cases, the people see love and caring for their neighbor, which is why they don’t give jack shit that a bunch a papers prove how discriminatory people can be.

Scalia points out, also, that the speed in which gay marriage has come before the court is too quick. After all, the anti-sodomy ruling of Bowers v. Harding was only 17 years ago. My message here for Scalia is this: are you surprised that time doesn’t stand still? As people have learned during the AIDS crisis, it is important to be able to be recognized as next to kin when your spouse is in danger of leaving this world. The benefits of marriage have protected and supported those who have just a loved one and are stuck in a position where they wouldn’t be able to solve a fiscal dilemma. Davidson thinks the country is ready to answer the gay marriage question, and so do I. It’s time to stop thinking the world moves slower than it really does, just so like how so many others stopped believing the world was fucking flat.

Filed under news politics gay marriage homosexuality gay lgbtq scalia supreme court doma prop 8 rights human rights social rights law