Yep, I'm that political kid.

A voice for those who can't find the words.

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lightspeedsound:

allahyil3analsohyouniyeh:

priceofliberty:

thefreelioness:

The NYPD tried to start a hashtag outpouring of positive memories with their police force. 

If this were ever a bad idea, it was probably the worst idea for arguably the most corrupt police force in America. 

via Vice:

What the person running the Twitter account probably failed to realize is that most people’s interactions with the cops fall into a few categories:

1. You are talking to them to get help after you or someone you knew was robbed, beaten, murdered, or sexually assaulted.

2. You are getting arrested. 

3. You are getting beaten by the police.

In category 1, you are probably not going to be like, “Oh, let me take a selfie with you fine officers so I can remember this moment,” and the other two categories are not things that the NYPD would like people on social media talking about. Additionally, the people who use Twitter a lot (and who aren’t Sonic the Hedgehog roleplayers) are the type who love fucking with authority figures. In any case, #myNYPD quickly became a trending topic in the United States, largely because people were tweeting and retweeting horrific images of police brutality perpetrated by New York City cops.

In which the NYPD’s attempt at “public relations” backfires tremendously.

this had me dying of laughter

…whoopsies

(via trashboat)

138 notes

The Boy Scouts of America, which voted last year to allow gay scouts but not openly gay scout leaders, has revoked the charter of a church-sponsored troop here for refusing to fire its adult gay scoutmaster.

The decision, which one gay rights organization said was a first since the policy change last year, essentially bars the Rainier Beach United Methodist Church and its 15 scouts from using logos, uniforms or names associated with the Boy Scouts as long as the scoutmaster and Eagle Scout Geoffrey McGrath, 49, remains in charge.

The church’s pastor, the Rev. Dr. Monica K. Corsaro, said Monday that Mr. McGrath was there to stay, and so was the youth group he leads, though perhaps without the familiar uniforms and the Scout oath.

“We’re going to stand firm,” she said. “Geoffrey attends our church, and this is a way to support our youth in the neighborhood.”

This month, the Boy Scouts ordered the dismissal of Mr. McGrath, a software engineer who is married to his longtime partner, after he spoke about his sexual orientation in a news article profiling the troop, which was formed last year in a south Seattle neighborhood heavily populated by immigrants and lower-income families. The decision to disenfranchise the organization, sent in a letter on Friday, came after church officials said they would continue to support Mr. McGrath and had no intention of following the order.

“Because the church no longer agrees to the terms of the B.S.A.-chartered organization agreement, which includes following B.S.A. policies, it is no longer authorized to offer the scouting program,” a spokesman for the Boy Scouts, Deron Smith, said in an emailed statement on Monday. “We are saddened by this development.”

The New York Times, "Boy Scout Troop Loses Charter Over Gay Leader" (via inothernews)

338 notes

vicemag:

Is America Finally Ready to Abandon the Electoral College and Embrace the Popular Vote
US presidential elections are frequently the butt of jokes worldwide, and deservedly so. Between the eye-popping fundraising totals, the awkward pandering to billionaires, and the shameless jockeying for the support of key interest groups in weird places like Iowa and New Hampshire, there’s a lot to hate.
Much of this can be blamed on the electoral college. Instead of simply counting votes nationwide and giving the Oval Office to the guy or gal with the most ballots, America holds 50 statewide elections, then awards points called “electors” to the winner of each election. It’s a confusing system that makes winning 51 percent of the votes in California more than ten times as valuable as winning 100 percent of the votes in Nebraska, and gives special status to the few swing states that could go either way. Standard practice nowadays is for candidates to camp out in the dozen or so of these key states, which enjoy special status because their cities are surrounded by dense, conservative suburbs that balance out the votes of liberal urbanites. This means millions of voters are effectively stuck on the margins of political life, and thanks to our system we risk disaster every four years.
George W. Bush’s incredible non-victory in 2000—which came, of course, thanks to an assist from his dad’s pals on the Supreme Court—may be the the most recent example, but it doesn’t even scratch the surface of the twisted intrigue that the electoral college has encouraged over the years. After the 1876 election saw the electors go one way and the popular vote the other, the “compromise” that was reached set the stage for a flood of Jim Crow laws and racial terrorism into the American South, as a key concession from the Republicans was to remove occupying federal troops that had been in the former Confederate states since the Civil War.
Continue

vicemag:

Is America Finally Ready to Abandon the Electoral College and Embrace the Popular Vote

US presidential elections are frequently the butt of jokes worldwide, and deservedly so. Between the eye-popping fundraising totals, the awkward pandering to billionaires, and the shameless jockeying for the support of key interest groups in weird places like Iowa and New Hampshire, there’s a lot to hate.

Much of this can be blamed on the electoral college. Instead of simply counting votes nationwide and giving the Oval Office to the guy or gal with the most ballots, America holds 50 statewide elections, then awards points called “electors” to the winner of each election. It’s a confusing system that makes winning 51 percent of the votes in California more than ten times as valuable as winning 100 percent of the votes in Nebraska, and gives special status to the few swing states that could go either way. Standard practice nowadays is for candidates to camp out in the dozen or so of these key states, which enjoy special status because their cities are surrounded by dense, conservative suburbs that balance out the votes of liberal urbanites. This means millions of voters are effectively stuck on the margins of political life, and thanks to our system we risk disaster every four years.

George W. Bush’s incredible non-victory in 2000—which came, of course, thanks to an assist from his dad’s pals on the Supreme Court—may be the the most recent example, but it doesn’t even scratch the surface of the twisted intrigue that the electoral college has encouraged over the years. After the 1876 election saw the electors go one way and the popular vote the other, the “compromise” that was reached set the stage for a flood of Jim Crow laws and racial terrorism into the American South, as a key concession from the Republicans was to remove occupying federal troops that had been in the former Confederate states since the Civil War.

Continue

1,098 notes

My dear,
In the midst of hate I found there was, within me, an invincible love.
In the midst of tears, I found there was, within me, an invincible smile.
In the midst of chaos, I found there was, within me, an invincible calm.
I realized, through it all, that…
In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer.
And that makes me happy. For it says that no matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger – something better, pushing right back.

Truly yours,
Albert Camus

Albert Camus

(via taking-back-taylor)

(via thatpoliticalkid)

0 notes

"A military judge found a former U.S. Naval Academy football player not guilty of a sexual assault charge Thursday at the conclusion of a three-day trial,” reports the AP’s Jessica Gresko. http://abcn.ws/NxNoh6
Victims’ advocates said the verdicts showed the military justice system is broken and called for Congress to pass Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s Military Justice Improvement Act, which failed to win enough support to advance in the Senate earlier this month.”

"A military judge found a former U.S. Naval Academy football player not guilty of a sexual assault charge Thursday at the conclusion of a three-day trial,” reports the AP’s Jessica Gresko. http://abcn.ws/NxNoh6

Victims’ advocates said the verdicts showed the military justice system is broken and called for Congress to pass Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s Military Justice Improvement Act, which failed to win enough support to advance in the Senate earlier this month.”

Filed under us football naval academy military sex assault case court law

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"Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair, whose court-martial made him the public face of the military’s struggle to prevent and police sexual misconduct in the ranks, dodged a jail sentence," yesterday, reports The Washington Post’s Craig Whitlock.
Instead, a military judge reprimanded him and fined him $20,000. Sinclair admitted to having an extramarital affair with a junior officer, but denied assaulting or threatening her. He also pled guilty to having improper relationships with two other women. http://wapo.st/1gKIitf

"Brig. Gen. Jeffrey A. Sinclair, whose court-martial made him the public face of the military’s struggle to prevent and police sexual misconduct in the ranks, dodged a jail sentence," yesterday, reports The Washington Post’s Craig Whitlock.

Instead, a military judge reprimanded him and fined him $20,000. Sinclair admitted to having an extramarital affair with a junior officer, but denied assaulting or threatening her. He also pled guilty to having improper relationships with two other women. http://wapo.st/1gKIitf

Filed under us crime news law general defense sex assault

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"The Pentagon has put the brakes on an environmental assessment of the effects of eliminating potentially dozens of intercontinental ballistic missile silos as defense officials sort out two conflicting provisions in the fiscal 2014 omnibus spending bill.
"Last month, Pentagon officials asked the Air Force to proceed with the study, which could be the firststep toward decommissioning silos at sites in Montana, North Dakota and Wyoming. But in an interview Thursday, a defense official said the department has put that assessment on hold as officials review whether they can proceed with the study.” http://goo.gl/0zRPws

"The Pentagon has put the brakes on an environmental assessment of the effects of eliminating potentially dozens of intercontinental ballistic missile silos as defense officials sort out two conflicting provisions in the fiscal 2014 omnibus spending bill.

"Last month, Pentagon officials asked the Air Force to proceed with the study, which could be the firststep toward decommissioning silos at sites in Montana, North Dakota and Wyoming. But in an interview Thursday, a defense official said the department has put that assessment on hold as officials review whether they can proceed with the study.” http://goo.gl/0zRPws

Filed under us missile silo study news defense

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"In February, House Armed Services Committee Chairman Buck McKeon (R-Calif.) asked the services to give Congress lists of items they’d buy if given more money. Of course, this is on top of the extra $26 billion the Pentagon is already requesting for fiscal 2015.
Yesterday, Kirby said what Hagel “has asked is that the [military] services coordinate the unfunded lists with him, not for chop or editing, just so he has a sense of what they’re going to submit.”
He said he did not know when they would be submitted to Congress.”

"In February, House Armed Services Committee Chairman Buck McKeon (R-Calif.) asked the services to give Congress lists of items they’d buy if given more money. Of course, this is on top of the extra $26 billion the Pentagon is already requesting for fiscal 2015.

Yesterday, Kirby said what Hagel “has asked is that the [military] services coordinate the unfunded lists with him, not for chop or editing, just so he has a sense of what they’re going to submit.”

He said he did not know when they would be submitted to Congress.”

Filed under congress national security security mckeon buck war us

0 notes

Call it the Global War on Terror account or the Overseas Contingency Operations fund, it doesn’t matter. The separate bill for war funding has always been an attractive place for the Pentagon and Congress to fence off dollars for their priorities.
But this year’s $79 billion “placeholder” request for these funds “has triggered criticism, disapproval and plenty of attention from industry, Congress and analysts alike,” report POLITICO’s Austin Wright and Philip Ewing. “A top House appropriator has warned the unusual request could delay passing the appropriations. Analysts have decried the military’s dependence on the dollars. And contractors continue to lobby for a piece of the pie.” http://politico.pro/1ijInUM

Call it the Global War on Terror account or the Overseas Contingency Operations fund, it doesn’t matter. The separate bill for war funding has always been an attractive place for the Pentagon and Congress to fence off dollars for their priorities.

But this year’s $79 billion “placeholder” request for these funds “has triggered criticism, disapproval and plenty of attention from industry, Congress and analysts alike,” report POLITICO’s Austin Wright and Philip Ewing. “A top House appropriator has warned the unusual request could delay passing the appropriations. Analysts have decried the military’s dependence on the dollars. And contractors continue to lobby for a piece of the pie.” http://politico.pro/1ijInUM

Filed under us global war on terror war on terror war afghanistan overseas contingency operations budget security

0 notes

The new sanctions target 20 individuals and a Russian bank. Plus, the president “signed a new executive order on Thursday that ‘gives us the authority to impose sanctions not just on individuals but on key sectors of the Russian economy,’ he said. It could lead to sanctions on Russia’s financial services, energy, metals and mining, defense and related material, and engineering sectors.”

The new sanctions target 20 individuals and a Russian bank. Plus, the president “signed a new executive order on Thursday that ‘gives us the authority to impose sanctions not just on individuals but on key sectors of the Russian economy,’ he said. It could lead to sanctions on Russia’s financial services, energy, metals and mining, defense and related material, and engineering sectors.”

Filed under sanctions us russia crimea ukraine obama putin economy

2 notes

“In response to sanctions from the U.S. and the E.U., Russia announced its own sanctions list yesterday, and it quickly became a badge of honor for those who were targeted.
"While I’m disappointed that I won’t be able to go on vacation with my family in Siberia this summer, I am honored to be on this list," said Sen. Dan Coats (R-Ind.) in a statement."

In response to sanctions from the U.S. and the E.U., Russia announced its own sanctions list yesterday, and it quickly became a badge of honor for those who were targeted.

"While I’m disappointed that I won’t be able to go on vacation with my family in Siberia this summer, I am honored to be on this list," said Sen. Dan Coats (R-Ind.) in a statement."

Filed under sanctions ukraine russia crimea